Posts made in August, 2013

Lechon sa Sale o Tanglad (Roasted Pork in Lemon Grass)

Lechon sa Sale o Tanglad (Roasted Pork in Lemon Grass)

A Filipino celebration is not complete without Lechon! The hours-long, roasted whole pig. But sometimes we over estimate the appetites of our guests and there are left overs. Not to worry, here is a ‘to live for’ left over soup dish. Once you have tried this, you wish there was more left over of the lechon. On another note, this same recipe with the addition of 1/2 cup of green tamarind juice, and changing the Chinese cabbage into Kangkong leaves, will turn it into Sinigang Na Lechon. Serves 6 persons. Ingredients: 1 kilo left over lechon bits (or you can buy Lechon by the kilo) 1 tablespoon crushed garlic 1 cup onion – sliced 2 tablespoons cooking oil 1/2 cup minced lemon grass stalks, white part only – about 2 to 3 stalks 2 pieces lady finger chili – siling mahaba 2 to 3 tablespoons patis (fish sauce) 6 cups water 1/2 head of Chinese cabbage slice into 2-inch lengths Procedure: In a medium sized casserole over medium-low heat, place oil in pot. Sauté garlic, onion and lemon grass till the onion is translucent. Add the fish sauce and chili and sauté for 30 seconds. Then add the lechon bits and water. Bring to a boil and then turn down to a simmer and continue to simmer for 30 to 40 minutes or till the skin of the lechon is tender. Adjust the taste with more fish sauce, freshly ground black pepper and salt (start with 1/4 teaspoon) Add the Chinese cabbage and simmer for 1 minute and serve. Note: To make green tamarind juice – 1 cup green tamarind boiled with 2 cups water, till the green tamarind has softened; around 20 minutes. Mash the tamarind in the water and strain; get 1/2 cup to put in the soup. Kangkong or water spinach – cut into 3-inch lengths; soak in water for 15 minutes; drain. Add in the soup and simmer for 3 minutes and...

Read More

Asadong Manok at Baboy (Soy Onion Pork and Chicken Stew)

Since refrigeration came only in the 1900’s, there are many Filipino foods that do not need refrigeration and this is one of them. Although this is good for the day it’s cooked and following day, I do not recommend eating it beyond the second day. Onions do not do well without refrigeration, therefore save yourself from a bum tummy. In some barrio fiestas, this is also served since it can be cooked the day before the fiesta. In the barrio fiesta, the whole rump of the pork is used and cut into huge chucks and when cooked, sliced into serving pieces. You can use only pork or only chicken. I use a combination to satisfy the craving of each one in the family. Ingredients: 500 grams chicken parts – I prefer to use legs and thighs cut in half 500 grams liempo (pork belly) slice into 1-inch by 2-inch by 1-inch 2 tablespoons calamansi or lemon juice 1/2 cup light soy sauce 2 cups sliced onions 1 teaspoon freshly crushed peppercorns 1 cup chicken broth 1 tablespoon crushed garlic 1/4 cup cooking oil salt to taste start with 1/4 teaspoon Procedure: In a non-corrosive cooking pot, warmed over medium-low fire, pour in cooking oil and sauté garlic and onions till onions are translucent. Add the chicken and pork and continue sautéing and mixing for about 3 minutes. Add the soy sauce, peppercorns, chicken broth and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Turn flame to low and simmer till the pork and chicken are tender; occasionally mix the pot to keep from burning or sticking to the bottom. Taste the mixture and adjust with salt. Serve hot with steaming hot...

Read More

Canonigo

Canonigo

Pan with Caramel Ingredients  1 cup sugar 2 tablespoons water Meringue Ingredients: 7 egg whites (1 cup egg whites) 1/2 cup (100 grams) sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon vanilla essence Sauce Ingredients: 1/2 cup (100 grams) sugar 7 egg yolks 1 cup fresh milk 1/4 cup orange liqueur Cake Procedure: Preheat oven to 300ºF (160ºC) Round baking tin 8-inch round, 3-inches tall Caramelize sugar with 2 tablespoons water in baking tin. Place 2 tablespoons water in baking tin. Place pan over very low fire, add in the sugar. Shake the pan to mix the water with the sugar; return to fire. Let the sugar melt and turn to a light golden tan. Do not use any metal instrument to stir the mixture; use only a wooden skewer or wooden spoon to stir the mixture. When all the sugar has dissolved, use a hot mitt on your hands and lift the pan from the fire and turn off fire. With mitts still on, tilt the pan from side to side, trying to cover all the sides and bottom of pan with caramel sugar. Let it spread evenly. When all the sides have been covered, set pan down and let cool. Set aside. Mix 1/2 cup sugar with baking powder. Set aside. In bowl of electric mixer, pour in egg whites. Using the wire whisk, beat egg whites on medium speed till foamy; then gradually add the sugar-baking powder mixture in four parts. Beat till the egg whites are stiff but not dry. Whisk in vanilla till just blended in. Carefully spoon meringue into caramelized baking tin, making sure that all the meringue is carefully packed in; avoiding any air pockets. Bake Bain Marie for 1 hour or till the top of the meringue is a golden brown. Turn off the heat in the oven and let the meringue rest inside for about 1 hour. Take the pan from the oven and continue to cool for another hour. Using a thin knife, let the knife go around the edge of the meringue to dislodge any part stuck to the caramel on the sides of pan. Get a serving plate larger than the meringue, with about 2-inch sides, to prevent sauce from falling out; and flip the meringue onto the serving dish and place in refrigerator. Make the sauce. Sauce Procedure: Using a double boiler over low fire, combine sugar, yolks, and milk, stirring constantly, until mixture thickens slightly. Use a wire whisk to stir so that there is no coagulation and the sauce is fine. Remove from fire and stir in the orange liqueur until well blended. Cool sauce and then refrigerate. When sauce is cool, whisk to mix and pour...

Read More

Search Masarap.ph